ABOUT ME

About me: My husband Chuck, our six-year-old Junior, our three-year-old Everette and I live in a town in Connecticut I affectionately call Mulletville Lite (aka my childhood hometown). My friends call me Nutjob, and they're right. In my husband's spare time he dresses up as a Viking and chases ghosts (and I'm the nutjob?). When I'm not busy working as a graphic designer, I lie in a ball in the corner.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

A lesson in cats and potatoes

Did I ever mention that we took Junior out of preschool before Diddly was born? My maternity leave started in December and I wanted him home with me and his new brother.

Taking Junior out was a welcome relief. He never really took to preschool; drop-offs continued to be a disaster, even after five months. And holy hell, the price tag for three days a week could have provided food for a small continent.

Besides all that, Junior was going through a phase where he wouldn't go to the bathroom without first removing his pants. When I picked Junior up at school, his pants were always on backwards. Always. When I asked the teacher about it, she said he wanted them that way, and who was she to stand in the way of his personal expression?

Personal expression my ass. The truth was she didn't want to help him put his damn pants on. I know that because Junior told me as much.

For what we were paying, his pants should have been washed and pressed and on correctly.

Since he's been home with me, Junior and I have spent a lot of time together (obviously). I've loved it. I really have. Having said that, caring for two small children has been incredibly challenging and look, I'm no saint. Sometimes I lose my patience. Sometimes I raise my voice. Sometimes I just can't say "Please stand still so I can brush your teeth" one more time in a nice, soothing voice because honestly? I'm going to lose my shit if I have to say it again.

So, there's the first part of the equation: Lots of time together (A) + Mrs. Mullet isn't a saint (B).

Now for C.

As a general rule, Chuck and I try not to bicker in front of Junior. But it happens. One minute you're slicing into your baked potato and the next you're exchanging words over whose turn it is to drag the 25-pound cat to the vet.

(It's Chuck's.)

Because I'm a weirdo, I often stop mid-spat and ask Chuck—jokingly—"Do you even like me?" It's a silly question, but it usually works. He'll soften and say of course. Then he'll forget what we were arguing about. Cue kissing and making up. Eating of baked potato. Voila.

I knew little ears were listening (I love that expression—it makes those nosy preschooler ears seem so sweet and benign, like something out of Goodnight Moon) but the other night, something happened that opened my eyes to how much they were absorbing.

Chuck was working a freelance job. It was the end of a long day full of meltdowns and tears. One of those days when everyone was off their game. Junior wouldn't stay in bed. I was trying to get Diddly to bed. Every time Diddly nodded off Junior would jump out of bed and race down the hall.

"Mommy! I need water."

"MOMMY! I have to tell you something! MOMMY! Where's my water?"

Diddly would start wailing.

Lather, rinse, repeat. I was shot. I kind of lost it.

I yelled.

Loudly.

Junior winced and skulked down the hall and as he did I heard it—a whisper:

"Do you even like me?"

I died a little. Right then and there. The arrow flew down the hall and pierced me in the heart. I put Diddly down, let him cry, and gave Junior a big hug. I told him I loved him.

It's moments like that (and that infamous winter hike) that render me completely and utterly humble. I realize how the commitment to my children is as expansive and demanding as the universe, and how just when I think I'm doing a decent job, life shows me I can do better. I can take deeper breaths, count to 10.

I can accept that some nights are going to be harder than others, but lowering the decibel of my own voice needs to be part of the equation.

Is that D? Yah, I guess so.

12 comments:

Cris said...

We have all been there. Kudos to you for recognizing it and taking the time (and the deep breath) to make it right. Your kiddos are lucky to have you as a mama.

Grand Pooba said...

Oh man kids really know how to get to us don't they??? Yeah, my heart would have broken into pieces!

PS Having a giveaway for $50 Target GC, come enter, it's for a good cause!

Pricilla said...

Goat hugs.
They are smart. And they understand exactly what is going on.

And he was probably looking for the attention you were giving to Diddley.

marybt said...

I recently had a similar incident with my 3 year old. Except she said, "You made me cry, Mom." Shit.

Frogs in my formula said...

They have a way of knowing exactly what to say, don't they?

VandyJ said...

You hurt my feelings was the worst thing Turbo could say to me when he was three. Pow right in the heart.
How do they do that? Make you go from wanting to kill them to loving them to pieces in five seconds flat.

Stephanie in Suburbia said...

Awww and ohhhhh at the same time. Those monkeys are little sponges, huh?

You know, I honestly think bickering in front of the kids is okay and healthy if it's bickering and not a real fight. You always hear that it's good for them to see conflict resolution.

Keely said...

Awwwwwww! I would have been heartbroken too.

I agree with Stephanie, if it's actually productive bickering (as opposed to just trying to irritate each other like my inlaws do), I think it's a good example. But yes, they absorb every damn thing we say.

Lori said...

That's the worst! Guilt hugs can only do so much, get that man some Sodor junk. (kidding?)

Is Junior at all interested in ninjas? That's how I got my daughter to be quiet when I was trying to get the then newborn settled. Ninjas tiptoe. Ninjas are stealthy. It works great until you wake up in the middle of the night with your wanna-be-ninja inches from your face wanting her water.

But, hey, the baby is still sleeping...

Texan Mama @ Who Put Me In Charge said...

Is it okay to think in your head, "Ya know, no, right now I DON'T like you!!!" but of course you say, "Honey, I like you. I love you! You're the best!!!"

Not that it ever happens to me... I'm just saying... hypothetically speaking...

I think it's normal for people who are together 24/7 to sometimes not like each other for a little while. THe fact that they stick together even though they are sick of each other is the basis of what commitment is about. It's "I am getting tired of you but I love you more than the little thing that's bugging me right now." It's "I promise to always be with you no matter what." It's "even when we get mad at each other, you can STILL count on me being here for you."

You're okay, mama. Keep on Keepin' on.

Maggie said...

This is something I struggle with on a regular basis. Especially the last couple of weeks when it has been school holidays and the weather has been shit. I've been ready to scream louder than Manson.

The thing is, you recognize the issue....so, that makes you awesome!

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